Master of Science (M.S.) in Bioengineering

General Information

Bioengineering is a broad and emerging field that impacts drug delivery, surgery, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment. Students successfully completing the Master of Science in Bioengineering (MSBioE) degree program will be prepared for professional careers in businesses related to medical diagnostics, prosthetic devices, and neural and other implants; the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries; and consulting in health-related fields, as well as other positions in industry, commerce, education, and government. Students will also be prepared to continue their formal education at the PhD level in a variety of science and engineering disciplines and at the MD level in certain cases.

Degree Requirements

Prospective students should consult the university catalog with respect to prerequisite requirements, admission requirements, admission to candidacy requirements, and deficiency requirements. The Master of Science in Bioengineering (MSBioE) degree is awarded to students who:

  1. Meet all University general degree requirements (see the university catalog).
  2. Satisfy the specific degree requirements of the Electrical Engineering Department, as described below with the required number of credits shown.

Master of Science Degree Thesis Option (30 credits)

  1. Requires 6 credits of orally defended thesis.
  2. Requires 24 credits of approved course work of which 9 credits are program core courses and the remaining 15 credits are approved elective courses offered by the Colleges of Engineering and Computer Science, Charles E. Schmidt College of Science, and Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing.

Note: No more than 3 credits of directed independent study may be applied toward the master's degree.

Master of Science Degree Non-Thesis Option (33 credits)

  1. Requires 3 credits of orally defended research project.
  2. Requires 30 credits of approved course work of which 9 credits are program core courses and the remaining 21 credits are approved elective courses offered by the Colleges of Engineering and Computer Science, Charles E. Schmidt College of Science, and Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing.

Note: No more than 3 credits of directed independent study may be applied toward the master's degree.

Program Core Course

  1. BME 5000 Introduction to Bioengineering (3)
    This course provides a broad perspective of Bioengineering as applied to topics in contemporary Biology, Physiology, and Medicine, including Biotechnology and Bioinformatics. A comprehensive final research paper is required of students in this course. The course is designed for graduate students and may be taken by senior undergraduates with permission of the instructor.
  2. BME 5742 Biosystems Modeling and Control (3)
    This course covers population growth, enzyme kinetics, heart and blood circulation, lung model, Hodgkin-Huxley nerve model, dynamic simulations, compartmental models, and drug delivery. The course is designed for graduate students and may be taken by senior undergraduates with permission of the instructor.
  3. BME 6762 Bioinformatics: Engineering Perspectives (3)
    Introduction to bio- and genetic-engineering. Concepts and definitions of molecular biological terms. Bioinformatics - definition and applications. Information resources and databases: proteins and genomes. Biological sequence analysis and applications. Sequence search/analyses tools and protocols. Bioinformatics versus modern information networks and WWW. Prior to registering for this course, it is recommended that students take PCB 3063, Genetics, or equivalent, or obtain permission from the instructor.

Distinctive Program Characteristics

  • Builds on the highly successful Bioengineering Graduate Certificate Program that was approved and started in Fall 2003, currently has 56 applicants, and has awarded 14 Certificates of Completion.
  • Faculty members teach courses and supervise graduate research assistants are drawn from departments and centers within the College of Engineering & Computer Science and the Charles E. Schmidt College of Science and, at this time, include a number of distinguished adjunct faculty, several of whom hold Ph.D. and MD degrees, Drs. Carlos Aparicio, Jeffrey Weiss, and Ilker Yaylali. Additional faculty and adjunct faculty members will be added.
  • Opportunities for graduate students to conduct research in centers, institutes, and facilities with which faculty have association, College of Engineering & Computer Science Robotics, Applied Stochastics Research, Imaging Technology, and Ocean & Systems Engineering Centers; Charles E. Schmidt College of Science Centers for Complex Systems & Brain Sciences and Molecular Biology & Biotechnology; Scripps Florida; Beckman Coulter Inc.; Northwest Medical Center; North Broward Medical Center; and Miami Children's Hospital, Brain Institute & Neuroscience Center. A number of opportunities also exist for students in small, highly specialized companies.
  • Responds to the many inquiries from prospective graduate degree-seeking national and international students interested in the Bioengineering area.
  • Responds to the State of Florida and national workforce needs of industries, hospitals, and agencies comprising the Pharmaceutical, Biotechnology, and Healthcare sectors of the economy. Is an integral part of the Enterprise Florida Life Sciences Roadmap.
  • Contains a Program Core that introduces students to the breadth of Bioengineering research topics.
  • In the second phase of implementation, Program Tracks are planned in the areas of Biomedical and Biosystems Engineering, Bioinformatics Engineering and Computer Science, Biotechnology Robotics and Automation, Biomechanics, and Neuroscience and Neurological Engineering. A General Bioengineering Studies track will remain.

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